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We are not here to be bystanders : a memoir of love and resistance
2020
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The co-organizer of the Women’s March describes how her experiences as a Palestinian Muslim-American feminist empowered her to become a globally recognized activist on behalf of the world’s marginalized communities. 75,000 first printing. - (Baker & Taylor)

"Women's March co-organizer Linda Sarsour shares how growing up Palestinian Muslim American, feminist, and empowered moved her to become a globally recognized and celebrated activist on behalf of marginalized communities across the country"-- - (Baker & Taylor)

Linda Sarsour, co-organizer of the Women’s March, shares an “unforgettable memoir” (Booklist) about how growing up Palestinian Muslim American, feminist, and empowered moved her to become a globally recognized activist on behalf of marginalized communities across the country.

On a chilly spring morning in Brooklyn, nineteen-year-old Linda Sarsour stared at her reflection, dressed in a hijab for the first time. She saw in the mirror the woman she was growing to be—a young Muslim American woman unapologetic in her faith and her activism, who would discover her innate sense of justice in the aftermath of 9/11. Now heralded for her award-winning leadership of the Women’s March on Washington, Sarsour offers a “moving memoir [that] is a testament to the power of love in action” (Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow).

From the Brooklyn bodega her father owned, where Linda learned the real meaning of intersectionality, to protests in the streets of Washington, DC, Linda’s experience as a daughter of Palestinian immigrants is a moving portrayal of what it means to find one’s voice and use it for the good of others. We follow Linda as she learns the tenets of successful community organizing, and through decades of fighting for racial, economic, gender, and social justice, as she becomes one of the most recognized activists in the nation. We also see her honoring her grandmother’s dying wish, protecting her children, building resilient friendships, and mentoring others even as she loses her first mentor in a tragic accident. Throughout, she inspires you to take action as she reaffirms that we are not here to be bystanders.

In this “book that speaks to our times” (The Washington Post), Harry Belafonte writes of Linda in the foreword, “While we may not have made it to the Promised Land, my peers and I, my brothers and sisters in liberation can rest easy that the future is in the hands of leaders like Linda Sarsour. I have often said to Linda that she embodies the principle and purpose of another great Muslim leader, brother Malcolm X.”

This is her story. - (Simon and Schuster)

Linda Sarsour, co-organizer of the Women's March, shares an 'unforgettable memoir' (Booklist) about how growing up Palestinian Muslim American, feminist, and empowered moved her to become a globally recognized activist on behalf of marginalized communities across the country.

On a chilly spring morning in Brooklyn, nineteen-year-old Linda Sarsour stared at her reflection, dressed in a hijab for the first time. She saw in the mirror the woman she was growing to be'a young Muslim American woman unapologetic in her faith and her activism, who would discover her innate sense of justice in the aftermath of 9/11. Now heralded for her award-winning leadership of the Women's March on Washington, Sarsour offers a 'moving memoir [that] is a testament to the power of love in action' (Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow).

From the Brooklyn bodega her father owned, where Linda learned the real meaning of intersectionality, to protests in the streets of Washington, DC, Linda's experience as a daughter of Palestinian immigrants is a moving portrayal of what it means to find one's voice and use it for the good of others. We follow Linda as she learns the tenets of successful community organizing, and through decades of fighting for racial, economic, gender, and social justice, as she becomes one of the most recognized activists in the nation. We also see her honoring her grandmother's dying wish, protecting her children, building resilient friendships, and mentoring others even as she loses her first mentor in a tragic accident. Throughout, she inspires you to take action as she reaffirms that we are not here to be bystanders.

In this 'book that speaks to our times' (The Washington Post), Harry Belafonte writes of Linda in the foreword, 'While we may not have made it to the Promised Land, my peers and I, my brothers and sisters in liberation can rest easy that the future is in the hands of leaders like Linda Sarsour. I have often said to Linda that she embodies the principle and purpose of another great Muslim leader, brother Malcolm X."

This is her story. - (Simon and Schuster)

Author Biography

Linda Sarsour is a Brooklyn-born Palestinian Muslim American community organizer and mother of three. Recognized for her award-winning intersectional work, she served as national cochair of the Women’s March, helping to organize the largest single-day protest in US history. She is the former executive director of the Arab American Association of New York and cofounder of the first Muslim online organizing platform, MPower Change, as well as Until Freedom, a national racial justice organization working with Black and Brown communities across the country. - (Simon and Schuster)

Linda Sarsour is a Brooklyn-born Palestinian Muslim American community activist and mother of three. Recognized for her award-winning intersectional work, she served as national cochair of the Women's March, helping to organize the largest single-day protest in US history. The former executive director of the Arab American Association of New York and cofounder of the first Muslim online organizing platform, MPower Change, she is also a founding member of Justice League NYC. - (Simon and Schuster)

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Booklist Reviews

In this unforgettable memoir, Women's March co-organizer Sarsour paints a vivid portrait of her life as an activist. Born to Palestinian parents and raised in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Sarsour grew up proud of her roots as a Palestinian American, a Muslim woman, and a New Yorker. She married soon after high school, gave birth to her children, and began working at the Arab American Association of New York (AAANY). The events of 9/11 altered her understanding of Muslim pride, but only propelled her deeper into the fight for justice. The tragic loss of her mentor was the truest test of Sarsour's commitment to social change. Early in her grief, she was named executive director of the AAANY, at just 25 years old. She vowed to carry her mentor's legacy far into the future. Sarsour has since organized with members of the Black Lives Matter movement, cofounded the Justice League of NYC, and co-organized the Women's March on Washington, the largest single-day protest in U.S. history. An incredible, galvanizing story of the power of participation. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews

In this unforgettable memoir, Women's March co-organizer Sarsour paints a vivid portrait of her life as an activist. Born to Palestinian parents and raised in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Sarsour grew up proud of her roots as a Palestinian American, a Muslim woman, and a New Yorker. She married soon after high school, gave birth to her children, and began working at the Arab American Association of New York (AAANY). The events of 9/11 altered her understanding of Muslim pride, but only propelled her deeper into the fight for justice. The tragic loss of her mentor was the truest test of Sarsour's commitment to social change. Early in her grief, she was named executive director of the AAANY, at just 25 years old. She vowed to carry her mentor's legacy far into the future. Sarsour has since organized with members of the Black Lives Matter movement, cofounded the Justice League of NYC, and co-organized the Women's March on Washington, the largest single-day protest in U.S. history. An incredible, galvanizing story of the power of participation. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Library Journal Reviews

A Palestinian Muslim American born and raised in Brooklyn, Sarsour learned about multiple richly intersecting communities while working at her father's bodega and became committed to social justice after 9/11. She has since served as national cochair of the Women's March on Washington and as the executive director of the Arab American Association of New York. Here she tells a vivid personal and political story of faith, feminism, and commitment to activism.

Copyright 2019 Library Journal.

Table of Contents

Foreword Purpose and Grace xi
Harry Belafonte
Introduction What Is Your Jihad? 1(12)
Part One Homegirl
One The Choice I Made
13(8)
Two El Bireh to Brooklyn
21(15)
Three Broken Windows
36(14)
Four Sitty Halima's Wish
50(9)
Five Everything Changed
59(9)
Six Our Sons Are Not Terrorists
68(12)
Seven Basemah, Beloved
80(13)
Part Two Intersectionality
Eight Breath and Memory
93(8)
Nine Lessons in Activism
101(9)
Ten The Pit Stop
110(8)
Eleven A Tale of Two Mosques
118(9)
Twelve Love Letter
127(9)
Thirteen Rakers and Spies
136(11)
Fourteen Your Fight Is My Fight
147(10)
Part Three The Sisterhood
Fifteen Social Justice Voltron
157(10)
Sixteen Nine Days in April
167(11)
Seventeen Road Warriors
178(12)
Eighteen Silence Will Not Protect You
190(7)
Nineteen The Women Who Marched
197(17)
Twenty Stand with the Dreamers
214(9)
Twenty-One We Are Not Here to Be Bystanders
223(10)
Epilogue Love Is Not Done 233(8)
Acknowledgments 241(4)
Notes 245

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